Now Playing Tracks

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Elisa Strozyk

Wooden. Rugs. Rolls those two words around in your mind hole for a minute or two. German artist Elisa Strozyk has created three variations of these delightful coverings. Strozyk dyes and connects row upon row of triangular pieces as she pulls together the end result of a colored wooden rug, which is so flexible that you can literally crumple it up and toss it into a corner. (via Design Milk)


SO MAD RN

THIS IS HURTING MY BRAIN
TOO AWESOME

goreelemental asked:

So, like, I learned something I should've known forever. I went to the Ripley's Believe It Or Not Aquarium in Gatlinburg, TN for spring break (fantastic, by the way--they took fantastic care of their animals!) and while I was there, I learned that Moray Eels are like space puppies, in that they enjoy lazing around on rocks and like to be pet by the aquarium workers. I also learned that pufferfish cram all their organs to one side when they puff up, seriously limiting their life-spans.

bogleech:

Yup! Morays seem to have a lot of circumstantial species-crossing social tendencies; even though they live alone and normally love to eat small crustaceans, they will welcome cleaner shrimp and other symbiotes.

Some predatory fish have also learned how to “recruit” morays to help them hunt. If a big grouper can’t get a prey animal out of a narrow crevice, it will go find a moray eel and waggle its head as a signal. The eel will then follow it back to the prey’s hideout and squeeze in after it.

So it’s not surprising they can become very tame and trusting towards extremely different creatures, like humans. Male and female morays also court each other by touch, so cuddles probably make them feel calm and safe.

likes cuddles

I love Morays so very much, I have a little stuffed one I got as a kid and always preached how adorable and sweet they can be

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union